Words of advice from Ray Bradbury

Here’s a link to a fantastic lecture by the late great Ray Bradbury on how to become a better writer.

Watch Ray Bradbury’s lecture here.

488px-Ray_Bradbury_(1975)_-cropped-Bradbury was, of course, a sci-fi genre writer but he produced work which still resonates and has had a significant impact on the culture. His first novel Fahrenheit 451 is named after the temperature at which paper ignites and presents a future where books are burned and freedom of speech and thought are banned. It’s a ‘fiction’ which is all too real in parts of the world today.

In this lecture Ray Bradbury was speaking to a room full of writing students and it’s a fascinating insight into the mind and work of a hugely successful author. His number one tip for writers who are starting out is this: write lots of short stories to practice rather than spend a year writing a novel which might be no good.

That’s strong advice I would say. Old Ray points out that if you write a story each week for a year then you are going to have 52 stories by the end of the year – and, chances are, not all of them are going to be bad!

“You are learning your craft – that’s the important thing.”

This craft, this habit of treating writing as something which has to be learned and practiced, is so important I think.

An issue which concerns me a little about the current trend towards self-publishing is that, for all the opportunities it brings, it can encourage people to publish work before they are really ready and to release books which are simply not good enough to be published. Knowing you face rejection encourages a writer to have self-discipline. Once you remove the possibility that your work might not be good enough some writers might believe there is no such thing as bad writing – the reader will be under no such illusion.

Ray also says: ‘writing is not a serious business, it is a joy and a celebration.’

It’s not work, he says, if it feels like work then stop doing it and do something else. His cure for writer’s block is simple – put down whatever you are writing and write something else instead, because you’ve picked the wrong subject.

Being true to yourself, and to the subjects which mean something to you, is the important thing he feels. During his lifetime he certainly put his money where his mouth was, turning down lucrative script writing jobs for movies because the subjects did not move him to write.

His advice to all of us writers is clear and honest and something we should all take heed of I think. He says, don’t concern yourself with what is commercial or what might sell, but write what you really ought to be writing.

“Your true self, your true fear, your true hope, your true love.”

Don’t forget if you get a moment to take a look at my book Song of the Sea God. You can look inside to read the first few pages free and download a free Kindle sample for UK readers here. And for readers in the USA here.